Panaceia or Hygeia

immunize yourself against the pandemic of lifestyle diseases

Posts Tagged ‘Type 2’

Rate of increase in Type 2 Diabetes in UK doubles in one year

Posted by Colin Rose on October 24, 2008

Has anyone considered the possibility that this disaster might be because the UK is the only developed country to have made statins non-prescription drugs? This is truly a revenge of unintended consequences. Just take your statin and eat anything. Result? An epidemic of obesity whose consequences are as bad or worse than the disease the statins were supposed to prevent.

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From The Independent

Diabetes may cause first fall in life expectancy for 200 years

By Jeremy Laurance, health editor
Monday, 20 October 2008

Britain is in the grip of a diabetes epidemic that threatens to overwhelm the NHS and could lead to the first fall in life expectancy in 200 years. The number of cases diagnosed has doubled in a year, figures out today will show. Family doctors recorded an extra 167,000 sufferers last year, compared with a rise of 83,000 in 2006-7.

The increase brings to almost 2.5 million the number of British diabetics. A further 500,000 people are thought to be affected but unaware of their condition. The condition shortens lives by 10 years and is a leading cause of circulatory problems and blindness.

The soaring rate of diabetes is driven by rising obesity. Today’s figures from Diabetes UK show five million people are registered as obese by their GPs, up from 4.8 million in 2006-07. At least a million more Britons are predicted to succumb to diabetes by 2010.

Professor Sir George Alberti, a Government adviser and former head of the International Diabetes Federation, said the accelerating increase was partly due to improved screening but also to a genuine rise in cases.

“It is a clarion call for society to take this seriously,” he added. “The catastrophe has started to happen. The Government has begun to tackle obesity and inactivity but converting good words into action is very difficult. It will take ages to have an effect.”

The World Health Organisation has predicted that deaths from diabetes in Britain would rise from 33,000 a year in 2005 to 41,000 by 2015 but Professor Alberti said that figure underestimated its true impact. More than 80 per cent of sufferers die from heart attacks or strokes and more than 1,000 a year suffer kidney failure requiring dialysis.

“The WHO figure [for deaths] was very conservative,” he said. “Large numbers die from heart disease and strokes [linked with diabetes] and they do not include those.”

Diabetes is spreading around the world, fuelled by increasing urbanisation and the spread of Western lifestyles. It is estimated to have killed 2.9 million people in 2000, equivalent to the number of Aids deaths, although it has received a fraction of the attention. From 170 million people affected in 2000, doctors predict the total will rise to 370 million by 2025, leading to an epidemic of blindness and amputations.

Researchers have warned that the increase in diabetes and other chronic diseases driven by rising obesity could lead to a fall in general life expectancy. Writing in the New England Journal Of Medicine in 2004, Jay Olshansky and colleagues at the University of Illinois said life expectancy could be cut by five years in the coming decades if obesity continued to increase. Douglas Smallwood, chief executive of Diabetes UK, said: “These are truly alarming figures. Part of why we have seen such a huge increase can be attributed to improved screening from healthcare services and greater awareness amongst those at high risk of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no getting away from the fact that this large increase is linked to the obesity crisis.

“Diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges facing the UK. It causes heart disease, stroke, amputations, kidney failure and blindness and more deaths than breast and prostate cancer combined. The NHS already spends £1m an hour on diabetes. The soaring diabetes prevalence will continue to put a massive strain on an already struggling NHS and, unless it can respond, people’s health could spiral downwards. We need to do all we can to raise awareness of the seriousness of diabetes and help people understand how a healthy lifestyle can help reduce their risk.”

Diabetes is a disorder in the metabolism of carbohydrate, leading to excessive thirst and the production of large amounts of urine caused by lack of insulin. Nine out of 10 sufferers have Type 2 diabetes, which usually affects older people but is now seen in younger people and children as weight has risen. The risk is 10 times higher in those who are obese, defined as having a body-mass index of more than 30.

Diabetes: The risks, the costs

*The condition causes blood-sugar levels to rise because of a lack of insulin. The risk is 10 times higher in people who are obese.

*Raised sugar levels lead to high blood pressure, increased risk of heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney damage and ulceration of the feet.

*It costs the NHS £1m an hour to treat. One pound in every £10 spent on the hospital service is for diabetes and its complications.

*Type 2 diabetes can be treated by diet and exercise and the effects are reversible if the damage has not gone too far.

*In more severe cases, drug treatment with tablets or injections of insulin is necessary.

*For up to 10 years, there are no symptoms, but doctors believe that the earlier that treatment begins, the less damage it causes.

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Pfizer abandons “cholesterol”

Posted by Colin Rose on October 1, 2008

After spending tens of $billions in DTC ads and bribes to doctors to terrorize the world into believing that blood “bad cholesterol” is the cause of atherosclerosis, the most common fatal disease, and selling hundreds of $billions worth of Lipitor to lower it, Pfizer has admitted there is no truth to and no more profit to be made from the myth of “dyslipidemia” that Pfizer and other peddlers of statin drugs created. Its much hyped drug, torceptripib, touted as the next Lipitor, which did all the “right” things to blood cholesterol actually worsened atherosclerosis in the ILLUSTRATE trial. Finally, the proof was in that high blood “bad cholesterol” is only a symptom of an atherogenic lifestyle, not the cause of atherosclerosis. But it will take a generation or two for the cholesterol myth to disappear.

So now Pfizer is directing more of its research toward Type 2 diabetes, a disease directly related to obesity, which is directly related to the moral hazard effect created by the cholesterol myth (I can eat anything as long as my cholesterol is low). Very clever marketing! Create diseases, real or imagined, then sell high profit drugs to to “treat” numbers associated with them.


PFIZER REFOCUSES ITS STRATEGY
BY SHANNON PETTYPIECE Bloomberg News
National Post
01 Oct 2008

Pfizer Inc. will abandon early-stage research on heart drugs as part of a strategy to sharpen its focus on ailments such as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes where the chances of a bigger profit are greatest. The New York-based company, the…read more…

Posted in atherosclerosis, cholesterol, coronary artery disease, diabetes, Type 2, drugs, obesity, statins | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Obesity weighs heavy on heart

Posted by Colin Rose on September 22, 2008

Bottom line: obese people have heart attacks at least ten years sooner and have much more diabetes than thin people, regardless of their blood cholesterol. So all those who say fat is OK as long as you are happy are wrong. And all those drug dealers say you are OK as long as you take a statin to lower your “bad” cholesterol are selling you a very expensive mirage.


Obesity weighs heavy on heart: study
SHARON KIRKEY CANWEST NEWS SERVICE
The Gazette
22 Sep 2008

Heart attacks are hitting the overweight more than a decade sooner than ?normal? weight people, researchers are reporting. A study of more than 111,000 people is one of the first to put real numbers to the risk of obesity and suggests ?excess…read more…

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Drug Marketing by Acronym. ACCORD and the Power of Myth

Posted by Colin Rose on July 14, 2008

CHRISTMAS, COURAGE, DIAMOND, DREAM, ILLUMINATE, ILLUSTRATE, REACH, PARAGON, PRAISE, PREVENT, ONTARGET, PROVE IT, ENHANCE, ACT, BEST, ADVANCE, HOPE, LIFE, PROSPER, CALIPSO, ASTEROID, ACCORD, CASHMERE, MIRACL, SYMPHONY, all names of recent drug studies that are carefully constructed pseudo acronyms invented by highly-paid marketers, implying that the drug studied has wonderful properties to prolong your life make it much more pleasant and worry-free. The marketers have learned that the name of the trial is more important than the results of the trial. Who would be attracted to older trials named WOSCOPS or LRC-CPPT? Would it really matter what the results of DREAM were? The acronyms imply that regardless of the result of the study the drug must be good for something. If one fiddles the statistics one can always find a sub-group in which the drug had some effect. You will never see a drug trials with the acronyms, DISEASE or DEATH but many of them do result in more of either of both.

To take one example, just the association of a drug with a trial like ACCORD (Action to COntrol Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) will give it cachet. But the results of the drug “action” in ACCORD was that  adding more expensive drugs to the usual cocktail to markedly lower blood glucose to an arbitrary “target” in type 2 diabetics with known vascular disease caused more deaths than not meeting the “target”. The latest expensive drugs for DM2 were supplied by the usual suspects: Abbot Laboratories, Amylin, AstraZeneca, Bayer Healthcare, GlaxoSmithKline, King Pharmaceuticals, Merck, Novartis, Sanofi-Avenis, Schering-Plough. Seven of the lead authors have received drug money from multiple companies. But will the results of this study made a dent in the sales of the latest heavily-marketed, expensive drugs like Diamicron, Prandase (Precose), Amaryl, Avandia (Actos), and Byetta? Not likely. As an apologist for the drug industry who receives money from Amylin and Merck, stated in an editorial in the New England Journal of Medicine, this study “…[does] not provide a definitive answer to the problem of glycemic control and cardiovascular disease. Other ongoing clinical trials will provide additional clarification.” More dead people when taking more drugs is not clear? One of the studies we are to await is, wait for it, ORIGIN. Reminds one of the Garden of Eden. So, the myth of the necessity to “normalize” symptoms or metabolic self-abuse that might even be protective will persist and these unproven drugs will continue to be prescribed for many more years costing the medical systems of the world many $billions and making huge profits for their makers, in spite of the total absence of proof that anyone is better off or living longer swallowing these drugs.

Legal Addictions

The ACCORD-type subject

These drugs were approved for sale purely on basis of their ability to lower blood glucose, a symptom of a self-abusive, atherogenic lifestyle. Look at the baseline characteristics of participants in ACCORD. Average BMI was 32. Obese is defined as BMI greater than 30. So almost all participants were obese. Is it not unethical to perform a drug study in such a group before they have all reduced their BMIs to under 25? Normalizing their weights, by far the most important “action”, would probably cure the diabetes in many of them and they wouldn’t even be in a study on diabetes. But one cannot sell drugs to healthy people. So why would any investigator receiving money from drug dealers insist that people with self-abusive lifestyles change their lifestyles before doing a drug trial? After all, no investigator wants to risk dying of old age before he or she can collect enough “events” (i.e. deaths) to write a paper whatever the conclusion might be.

Results from ACCORD. More deaths on “intensive” (more expensive drugs) therapy

Drs Krumholz and Lee, both with no ties to drug dealers write in a Perspective article in the same issue of the NEJM. “Clearly the way in which risk factors [blood cholesterol, blood glucose, high blood pressure] are modified does matter. Lifestyle interventions may [sic] have few risks, but we cannot assume the same for drugs…”  “…ultimately we need to understand a strategy’s effects on people, not just on surrogate end points.” But even they refuse to recognize the absolute need for lifestyle change before starting drugs in patients with diseases of lifestyle. What risks could lifestyle change possibly have?

Posted in atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes, Type 2, diet, drugs, obesity, professionalism | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »