Panaceia or Hygeia

immunize yourself against the pandemic of lifestyle diseases

Posts Tagged ‘food’

The wrong food fight

Posted by Colin Rose on February 11, 2009

Very well written. But the biggest nutritional problem is not finding cheap brown rice but obesity, too many calories from all sources, resulting in many disastrous consequences, like Type 2 diabetes. If the population cut calorie intake by an average of 20% we could save $billions in food, waste disposal and medical costs. And the best way to do that is to ditch the junk food. However, I note that Becel margarine is a “founding sponsor” of the HSF. If there is any food junkier than margarine I would like to know. So the HSF can’t risk condemning junk food and losing it’s main sponsor.


The wrong food fight

National Post
11 Feb 2009

We feel awkward questioningthe judgment of the Heart and Stroke Foundation (HSF) when it comes to cardiac health issues, but their new and much-trumpeted report about the supposed costs of healthy eating seems deranged. The foundation blasts grocers…read more…

 

 

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Climate change is a challenge for us all

Posted by Colin Rose on December 11, 2008

 

The StatsCan data show that Governments, David Suzuki and Al Gore have had very little effect of profligate consumption. We are programmed by billions of years of evolution to consume anything we can get our hands on regardless of the destruction our greed is causing to ourselves or the environment. But it does appear that capitalist democracy has a marvelous self-correcting mechanism. The current recession clearly shows that when uncontrolled greed causes the money to run out consumption and GHG emissions drop dramatically but we aren`t dying like house flies in winter. For the sake of the environment if not our own health one can hope that the recession will last long enough that we will learn to accept that we can live happily with a lot less food, drugs and gadgets. 


Climate change is a challenge for us all
THE STUDY CITED IS AVAILABLE IN STATSCAN’S THE DAILY FOR DEC. 9, AT WWW. STATCAN.GC.CA
The Gazette
11 Dec 2008

Climate change is a challenge not only for governments and big corporations, but for every person on Earth, since we are each individually responsible for generating greenhouse gases. New figures from Statistics Canada drive the point home, showing…read more…

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Health Centre Food – Not Healthy

Posted by Colin Rose on July 30, 2008

Drs Freedhoff and Stevenson are trying to do what we tried to do more than 20 years ago, change the food policies of hospitals. We have encountered all the same excuses listed below. What has taken us many years to accept and what these doctors fail to realize is that hospitals have no interest in promoting or maintaining health; they exist exclusively to treat disease. If the population were as healthy as they could be by continual vigilance in lifestyle choices there would be very little need for hospitals. Health is not profitable and will not support massive “health care” bureaucracies and unions. From the point of view of the “health care” bureaucracy and “health care” unions the ideal situation is to have a chronically sick but breathing population in constant need of “health care”, profitably supplied by said bureaucracies and unions.

Most hospital have now changed there names to some variation on “health center” and medical systems now call themselves “health care” providers, implying that only these institutions can guarantee health. Whenever I hear this I think or Orwell’s 1984. “War is Peace”; “Disease is Health”. Newspeak can exist in democracies in which self-perpetuating bureaucracies must ensure their survival by thought control and fear of death.

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CMAJ • July 29, 2008; 179

Frying up hospital cafeteria food

Yoni Freedhoff, MD, Medical Director, Bariatric Medical Institute, Ottawa, Ont.

Rob Stevenson, MD, Cardiologist, Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, NB

Would you like fries with that angioplasty?” Sadly, this is not as far fetched as you might imagine. Although hospitals are the front line for delivering medical treatment, health promotion and education, paradoxically, the foods they sell are frequently generic versions of fast food staples or, worse yet, brand-name fast food. Remarkably, despite nutrition’s indisputable role as one of our most important determinants of health,1 grassroots calls for hospital cafeteria reform often face resistance from hospital administrators and even some allied health professionals.

In dialogue with hospital administrators, we have met 3 main arguments against hospital cafeteria reform. First, they say they are not the “food police.” The hospital’s role need not be one of policing but rather one of health care leadership. Simply put, the sale of unhealthy foods along with the absence of nutritious alternatives undermine the institution’s role in health promotion. Although we do not propose that hospitals be held accountable for dietary choices, we do feel hospitals have a strong societal obligation to lead by example.

Second, public and institutional sentiment holds that adults are responsible for their own food choices. Consequently some people wonder whether hospitals should be restricted to selling exclusively healthy food. Although this argument has merit,what is not debatable is a hospital’s duty to empower consumers with the information required to make informed choices. Unfortunately, restaurant food choice is anything but informed. Consumers underestimate by 2 to 4 times the saturated fat, calories and sodium content of typical restaurant foods.2 However, providing accurate point-of-sale nutritional information significantly improves consumers’ choices.2 As it stands, with limited or no in-hospital nutritional information available, and frequently no nutritious alternatives offered, hospitals do not enable informed choice.

Finally, there is the question of money. Although Canadian hospitals have fewer fast-food outlets than US centres,3 the transition of their cafeterias from services to institutional profit centres is evident. We have even heard it forewarned that hospital programs could be jeopardized if healthier foods fail to sell. This alarmist warning ignores 2 of a hospital’s most important roles: the mission to promote health and the moral obligation to lead by example. Notably, in its 2007 annual report, the Compass Group, one of the world’s market leaders in retail food service delivery, including hospitals, attributed part of its rising profits to its new focus on healthy eating programs.4

Although there are no established criteria for healthy hospital cafeterias, there are healthy initiatives. California’s Sutter General Hospital enables informed choice by posting the nutritional information for a week’s worth of entrees at the cafeteria entrance. Others serve healthy choices with predominantly vegetarian menus, and there are “farm produce to hospital” programs in Texas, Vermont, North Carolina and Iowa.5 The purpose of the recently launched Canadian Healthy Hospital Cafeteria Project Survey, which one of us (R.S.) helped develop, is to identify Canadian examples of such initiatives.6

Addressing this problem will require a shift in values and thinking similar to when hospitals stopped selling cigarettes and later banned smoking on hospital grounds. Today the majority of our adult population is overweight or obese. In this fight, our dietary environment is the new battleground. Junk food is the new tobacco. Now more than ever, it is our ethical and medical responsibility to ensure that hospitals take the lead in serving foods that reflect evidence-based nutrition.

Thus, we call upon all hospitals as community health care leaders to immediately enable healthy and informed choices in their cafeterias. This would include ensuring the availability of flavourful entrees free of trans fats and low in calories, sodium and saturated fat, as well as posting nutritional information on menu boards and at point-of-sale for all foods. These first steps in cafeteria reform will help hospitals renew their focus on health and put an end to deep-fried hypocrisy.

  1. Kant AK, Graubard BI, Schatzkin A. Dietary patterns predict mortality in a national cohort: The national health interview surveys, 1987 and 1992. J Nutr 2004;134:1793-9.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  2. Burton S, Creyer EH, Kees J, et al. Attacking the obesity epidemic: the potential health benefits of providing nutrition information in restaurants. Am J Public Health 2006;96:1669-75.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  3. McDonald CM, Karamlou T, Wengle JG, et al. Nutrition and exercise environment available to outpatients, visitors and staff in children’s hospitals in Canada and the United States. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2006;160:900-5.[Abstract/Free Full Text]
  4. Compass Group. Delivering profitable growth: annual report 2007. Surrey (UK): The Group; 2007. Available: www.compass-group.com/NR/rdonlyres/00F11551-A102-4E1C-AADD-D0DCFD95C723/0/Compass_Report_2007.pdf (accessed 2008 June 23).
  5. Gottlieb R, Shaffer A. Soda bans, farm-to-school, and fast food in hospitals: an agenda for action. Presentation at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting; 2002 Nov 13. Available: http://departments.oxy.edu/uepi/publications/APHA_Talk.htm (accessed 2008 June 23).
  6. Canadian Healthy Hospital Cafeteria Project Survey. [To complete the survey go to www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=CMsk1a3OrVFrbBABU6udgQ_3d_3d (accessed 2008 June 23)].

George Orwell predicted this. "Hospital" is antithetical to the "Health". "Health Centre" implies a protective, nurturing bureaucracy. No one will get sick there.

 

IMG_0194

Vending machines in the McGill University Health (sic) Center

MUHC

Partners in Disease Care. Healthy lifestyles are also not good for union employment.

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DIRECT. More obese liars.

Posted by Colin Rose on July 16, 2008

We have already commented on a similar diet study, A to Z. Again with DIRECT (DIetary RandomizEd Controlled Trial) we have another attempt to prove the Atkins diet is better but is really another demonstration of lying by most overweight and obese people. Any study on diet and energy balance that cannot first demonstrate that the First Law of Thermodynamics is obeyed from self-reported data is totally unreliable and unreproducible and should never be published.

While the data as presented are hard to interpret in terms of detailed energy balance because daily energy intake and expenditure is not reported, as it should have been, the subjects claimed to be doing more exercise and eating less but only lost 10 pounds in two years. The prescribed diets contained 1800kcal for men and 1500kcal for women. These values are close to the basal metabolic rates of these mostly obese people. They should have lost weight continuously and markedly during the trial. Let’s see how much they should have lost if they were reporting accurately. They claimed to be eating about 500 kcal less than baseline per day on all diets. Even doing the same amount of exercise they should have lost about a pound per week (one pound of fat is about 3500 kcal) or about 50 pounds per year or 100 pounds in 2 years. Since they claimed to be doing more exercise they should have lost even more. If they had been telling the truth, most participants should have starved to death well before the end of the study! Ergo, most overweight and obese people lie about food intake and exercise; they tell investigators what the investigators want to hear.

Obesity is and always has been caused by junk food addiction. Until we deal with that, the pandemic of obesity and its terrible consequences will only worsen. Unlike most infectious diseases, there is no vaccine against  addictions. We all must make the right choices as to what we put into our bodies. In developed capitalist democracies resisting the self-destructive temptation to consume all manner of cheap addictive substances or to adopt addictive behaviours readily supplied by highly profitable enterprises is the hardest task we have. And how to deal with it is not taught in medical school.

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That obese people lie about food intake was proven beyond doubt by a study using doubly-labeled water to measure true energy expenditure. About 65% of these subjects were overweight or obese. They claimed to be eating only about 1500 kcal/day, about 40% less than they actually ate, but were burning 2500. So, they should have had a deficit of 1000 kcal/day and be losing weight dramatically but their weights were stable. Ergo they were “misreporting”, a euphemism for lying.

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Disney World

Is she on a low-fat or low-carb diet?

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Canadian Cardiologists Advise “healthy eating habits” but Eat Junk

Posted by Colin Rose on July 2, 2008

“Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.”
                  –Albert Schweitzer

In his editorial in the latest issue of the CJC (June, 2008) Dr. Lyall Higginson states, “If we intend to have a lasting impact on this country’s well-being in the future, we must have increased funding to help us reduce avoidable risk factors by zeroing in on healthy eating habits…”

With the emphasis on lifestyle advocated by the CCS one would expect that members of the CCS would be exemplary in their food choices.

Here are some photos of the “food” served CCC sponsored events included in the registration fee last year at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress in Quebec City.

Cardiologists' Food, Pastries
Pastries

 

Cardiologists' Food, Foccacia Bread with Montreal Smoked Pastrami

Foccacia Bread with Montreal Smoked Pastrami

At the Soirée Québec the only fresh vegetables were in the decorative glass jars. Except for small decorations, there were no fresh fruit.

How can he CCS have any legitimacy in demanding “increased funding” to “reduce avoidable risk factors” unless the CCS and its members show that they practice what they preach? Or is it because seven out of eight cardiologists take a statin and think they can eat anything.

We would hope that at this year’s CCC in Toronto more care will be given to “zeroing in on healthy eating habits” when food is part of a planned event.

If the CCC Toronto organizing committee would like help in arranging healthy food selections, we would be happy to assist them myself or arrange for such assistance.

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